Tendinopathy Waupaca WI

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David Michael Henneghan, MD
(715) 342-7950
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Michaels Hospital, Stevens Point, Wi
Group Practice: Ministry Health Care At Rice Medical Center; Rice Medical Center Ministry Health Care

Data Provided By:
James Henry De Weerd, MD
(715) 345-5100
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Sean P Keane MD
(414) 277-1155
2015 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Lewis Chamoy
(414) 453-7418
2500 N Mayfair Rd
Milwaukee, WI
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Joel Anthony Wallskog, MD
(262) 334-3451
205 Valley Ave
West Bend, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1996
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Hospital, Milwaukee, Wi
Group Practice: Aurora Medical Group Hartford

Data Provided By:
Kim Harold Lulloff, MD
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
Dr. Rodney Lefler
Neuroscience Group of NE Wisconsin
920-725-9373 or toll free 800-201-1194
1305 W. American Drive
Neenah, WI
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Cervical spine disorders,Degenerative disc disease,Degenerative spinal conditions,Herniated disc / bulging disc,Lumbar spine disorders,Muscle pain / muscle strain,Neck pain,Sciatica / radiculopathy,Scoliosis and deformity,Spinal stenosis,Spondylolisthesis,Sports injuries,Thoracic spine disorders,Whiplash
Treatments
Exercise,McKenzie Method,Musculoskeletal manipulation,Physical therapy,Rehabilitation,Sports medicine,Strength and Conditioning
Proffesional Affiliation
Wisconsin Chiropractic Association,National Strength and Conditioning Association

Curtis A Crimmins
(414) 453-7418
2500 N Mayfair Rd
Milwaukee, WI
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.JOSEPH TRADER
(920) 682-6376
501 North 10th Street
Manitowoc, WI
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi
Year of Graduation: 1971
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
James E Self
(608) 238-9311
340 S Whitney Way
Madison, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
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Best Treatment for Tendinopathy

It’s not clear what is the best treatment for tendinopathy. That’s the conclusion of researchers reviewing all the published studies on the topic. Tendinopathy refers to a painful tendon condition caused by overuse. Although it feels like it, it’s not the same as tendonitis. There’s pain but no actual inflammation.

Treatment has traditionally focused on providing anti-inflammatory measures. This has included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroid injections, and physical therapy modalities. Stretching and strengthening exercises have always been a part of the standard treatment approach.

More recently, shock wave therapy, low-level laser therapy, sclerotherapy, and growth factors and stem cell treatment have been added. The results of all treatment methods were compared by performing a literature review. The authors summarized the results of 177 studies. They did not evaluate the quality of the work done.

For the most part, it appears that NSAIDs and cortisone injections offer short-term relief. There just isn’t a long-term benefit of these treatments. Results using heat and light modalities seem inconsistent. But this may be more likely to occur because of how the studies were conducted. Without consistent methods and measures, it’s difficult to compare one study to another.

The most effective treatment may be eccentric lengthening exercises, sclerotherapy, and nitric oxide patches. Eccentric exercises are done by placing the affected muscle in a shortened position then lengthening the muscle against resistance.

Sclerotherapy is the injection of a chemical to produce scarring in the blood vessels. The idea is to close down tiny blood vessels and destroy nerve fibers that form in the damaged area. Nitric oxide has some potential for tendon healing. A patch placed over the skin delivers an enzyme that acts as a chemical messenger to provide pain relief.

Newer treatments such as growth factors and stem cells look promisin...

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