Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC) Injury Specialists Wilson NC

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Gerald C VanDen Bosch
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Rd
Wilson, NC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
A T Jennette, MD
(252) 243-9629
PO Box 3148
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1959

Data Provided By:
Gerald C Vanden Bosch, MD
(252) 243-9629
PO Box 3148
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided By:
Michael Griffin Glover, MD
252-243-9629 x235
PO Box 3148
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
Dr.ROBERT SATTERFIELD
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Rd W
Wilson, NC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1995
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Paul Reginald Greenlaw, MD
(252) 293-7825
1803 Forest Hills Rd W
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Paul Reginald Greenlaw
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Road
Wilson, NC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Adult Reconstructive Orthopaedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Lewis Paul Martin, MD
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Rd W
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Robert N Satterfield, MD
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Rd W
Wilson, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1995
Hospital
Hospital: Wilson Memorial Hospital, Wilson, Nc
Group Practice: Wilson Orthopedic Surgery & Neurology Center Pa

Data Provided By:
Dr.Gerald Vanden Bosch
(252) 243-9629
1803 Forest Hills Rd W
Wilson, NC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1977
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Wilson Medical Center
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC) Injuries

A Patient's Guide to Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC) Injuries

Introduction

Triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injuries of the wrist affect the ulnar (little finger) side of the wrist. Mild injuries of the TFCC may be referred to as a wrist sprain. As the name suggests, the soft tissues of the wrist are complex. They work together to stabilize the very mobile wrist joint. Disruption of this area through injury or degeneration can cause more than just a wrist sprain. A TFCC injury can be a very disabling wrist condition.

This guide will help you understand

  • what parts if the wrist are involved
  • how these injuries occur
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatment options are available

Anatomy

What parts of the wrist are involved?

The wrist is actually a collection of many bones and joints. It is probably the most complex of all the joints in the body. There are 15 bones that form connections from the end of the forearm to the hand.

The wrist itself contains eight small bones, called carpal bones. These bones are grouped in two rows across the wrist. The proximal row is where the wrist creases when you bend it. The second row of carpal bones, called the distal row, meets the proximal row a little further toward the fingers.

The proximal row of carpal bones connects the two bones of the forearm, the radius and the ulna, to the bones of the hand. On the ulnar side of the wrist, the end of the ulna bone of the forearm moves with two carpal bones, the lunate and the triquetrum.

The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) suspends the ends of the radius and ulna bones over the wrist. It is triangular in shape and made up of several ligaments and cartilage. The TFCC makes it possible for the wrist to move in six different directions (bending, straightening, twisting, side-to-side).

The entire triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) sits between the ulna and two carpal bones (the lunate and the triquetrum). The TFCC inserts into the lunate and triquetrum via the ulnolunate and ulnotriquetral ligaments. It stabilizes the distal radioulnar joint while improving the range of motion and gliding action within the wrist.

There is a small cartilage pad called the articular disc in the center of the complex that cushions this part of the wrist joint. Other parts of the complex include the dorsal radioulnar ligament, the volar radioulnar ligament, the meniscus homologue (ulnocarpal meniscus), the ulnar collateral ligament, the subsheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris, and the ulnolunate and ulnotriquetral ligaments.

Injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex involves tears of the fibrocartilage articular disc and meniscal homologue. The homologue refers to the piece of tissue that connects the disc to the triquetrum bone in the wrist. The homologue acts like a sling or leash between these two structures.

Another important structure to unde...

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