Tricep Injury Treatment Midlothian VA

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Tricep Injury Treatment. You will find informative articles about Tricep Injury Treatment, including "A Rare But Important Tendon Injury". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Midlothian, VA that can help answer your questions about Tricep Injury Treatment.

Paul George Kiritsis
(804) 379-2414
13700 Saint Francis Blvd
Midlothian, VA
Specialty
Adult Reconstructive Orthopaedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Charles William Dabney, DDS
(804) 794-8943
13321 Midlothian Tpke Ste A
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
David Wayne Miller, MD
(804) 560-5595
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided By:
Harry A Dunlevy, DMD
(804) 794-3498
11601 Robious Rd Suite 130
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
John W King, DDS
(804) 739-3399
5921 Harbour Ln Ste 300
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Mark H Hadfield
(804) 379-2414
13700 St Francis Blvd
Midlothian, VA
Specialty
Adult Reconstructive Orthopaedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Richard H Lee, DMD
(804) 379-2205
14267 Midlothian Tpke
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dale Cole Rogers, DDS
(804) 794-9789
1600 Huguenot Rd
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Harry Albert Raddin, DDS
(804) 745-0100
13841 Hull St Rd Ste 3
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
John Donald Zachary, MD
1521 Huguenot Rd
Midlothian, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Deaconess Hosp Of Cleveland, Cleveland, Oh

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

A Rare But Important Tendon Injury

When Popeye, the cartoon sailor man wanted to show off his muscles, he lifted his arm and flexed his biceps muscle. Every child who ever wanted to show off his or her strength has imitated this posture ever since. But when Arnold Schwarzenegger, a well-known actor in Terminator movies posed, it was always with the hands pressed together in front of his body. This body builder pose shows off the chest and triceps muscles. The triceps is located along the back of the upper arm. It's the triceps muscle that catches our attention in this article.

The triceps muscle doesn't tear or rupture very often. In fact, of all the tendons in the body that do get injured, injuries affecting this one are reported the least often. When it does happen, it's usually in a professional-level football player or weight lifter. Of course, the nature of these sports with potentially violent contact or powerful lifts increases the risk of this type of injury. But the illegal use of steroids to build up the muscles can lead to rupture of the triceps tendon, too. Anyone who falls on an outstretched hand is at risk for a triceps injury. Getting cut with a knife or other sharp object such as a piece of glass can also disrupt the muscle and/or its tendon at its attachment.

The triceps tendon is a broad three-sectioned muscle that comes down along the back of the upper arm from the shoulder and inserts into the back of the elbow. The place where these three sections meet into one tendon and attaches to the bone is called the triceps footprint. When the muscle is completely torn, the tendon usually pulls away from its footprint. Sometimes the traumatic event is so powerful that the tendon pulls away still attached to the footprint, taking a piece of the underlying bone with it. Because the muscle functions to straighten the elbow, when it is ruptured, arm extension is compromised.

What does a torn triceps look and feel like? First, there's pain reported along the back of the elbow and visible swelling there. It is very tender to touch in this same area. Often, there's a large indentation in the skin called a defect just above the olecranon (point of the elbow). The defect can be seen and felt.

There may be weakness with elbow extension against resistance. The patient may not be able to extend (straighten) the elbow at all or only through part of the normal range-of-motion. But surprisingly, a completely ruptured triceps doesn't mean the patient won't always be unable to extend the elbow against resistance. There is another muscle that helps the triceps (the anconeus) and it may compensate for the loss of the main muscle.

The examining physician can do a clinical test to look for a triceps rupture. It's modified from a test for ruptures of the Achilles tendon at the back of the foot/heel. A squeezing pressure is applied by the examiner to the triceps muscle. The test is done with the patient lying face down on an examining table. The elbow is bent ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com